Archive for April, 2012

Containing the Semantic Explosion

Yesterday afternoon, I delivered a talk to the PhiloWeb Workshop at the WWW2012 Conference titled “Containing the Semantic Explosion” with Cameron Buckner and Colin Allen. It is an overview of the InPhO Project architecture, known as dynamic ontology, and a preview of some forthcoming data mining tools. [slides]

The explosion of semantic data on the information web, and within digital philosophy, requires new techniques for organizing and linking these knowledge repositories. These must address concerns about consistency, completeness, maintenance, usability, and pragmatics, while reducing the cost of double experts trained both in ontology design and the target domain. Folksonomy approaches address concerns about usability and personnel at the expense of consistency, completeness, and maintenance. Upper-level formal ontologies address concerns about consistency and completeness, but require double experts for the initial construction and maintenance of the representation. At the Indiana Philosophy Ontology (InPhO) Project, we have developed a general methodology called dynamic ontology, which alleviates the need for double experts, while addressing concerns about consistency, completeness and change through machine learning over a domain corpus, and concerns about usability and pragmatics through human input and semantic web standards. This representation can then be used by other projects in digital philosophy, such as the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP) and PhilPapers, along with resources outside of digital philosophy enabled by the LinkedHumanities project. [slides]

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Grad School: The Right Place

If you like where you live, if you like what you do,
If you like what you’re seein, when you’re lookin at you,
If you like what you’re sayin, when you open your face,
Then you got the right feeling, you’re in the right place.
Monsters of Folk – “The Right Place”

In November, I delivered two lectures to student organizations on campus and realized that I really miss teaching. Despite the amazing flexibility of a career in research and development, I won’t be able to find fulfillment until I am working with students. The only way to realize that goal is to become a professor, and in order to realize that I need a PhD, so I applied to graduate schools in December.

After visiting the available options, I’ve decided to continue my studies at Indiana University, pursuing the Joint PhD In Cognitive Science and Computer Science. All in all, IU just feels like the right place. I’m well-positioned to make a lasting impact, both in my own studies and in the community, and there’s no break for moving to a new city and building a new professional network. Plus, there is a large amount of social and financial stability in Bloomington, which helps maintain my sanity.

As for now, I’m off to Lyon, France to give a presentation titled “Containing the Semantic Explosion”, covering work with the Indiana Philosophy Ontology Project. An abstract and slides will follow later this week.

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